Newly Found Direction

Going from not having a direction to having one is such a good feeling. Although the newly found direction can be equivalent to a personal compromise that is made in a situation, where the trajectory of life is in the hands of others; however, the new direction still provides direction seekers with a momentary comfort, of which may have been missing for quite some time.

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I wonder sometimes all the hurdles that I have to jump over in life are results of my past wrongdoing. All humans are imperfect. If we all are prone to making mistakes, why am I seemingly the one, who has the most winding roads to chart and gets often swelled up in other’s drama, while many acquaintances I know have gone on to live a life of their wishes?

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We all wish for something that we don’t have, and for an opportunity to visit a place that we have never been to. We wish, because, intuitively, we feel a connection between us and the subject of our wishful aspiration. At times, I admire people, who have a tendency to fixate on the practicality; instead of the aspirational grandeur of their wishes. The tangibility of their wishes protects them from experiencing the gut-wrenching pain that those aspiration seekers have to endure in waiting for the unpredictable fruition of their dreams.

A New Native Land

We are all humans. We all want to belong. In a world, where nothing is statically permanent, a sense of belonging is more than ever sought after.

A sense of belonging is usually found in a communal context, in a common history and in a shared interest. That being said, in a city, such as Toronto, where most people are no longer defined and restricted by narrow personal viewpoints and geographical territories, we can all now find a place to belong; a place that is far from our birthplace and native land.

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Yesterday, I came across a colorful gathering at a public square in downtown Toronto.

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Members of Canada’s Sikh community were there to attend Khalsa Day parade. Immersed in the South Asian crowd, as well as the smell of different spices that filled with the air, in front of me was a crowd of people, who were far from their ancestral birthplaces but had found a place to belong and to call their new native land.

Innocent Playground

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I don’t think that childhood is the best time in a person’s life. What makes many people think that way is perhaps because, as children, we play in the moment without allowing the past and the future anxieties to haunt us and to steal the joy, which makes us over the moon, away from our playtime.

Think about it, as adults, we don’t have a lot of playtime. To feel like playing while doing our best to make ends meet, we are aspired to have a career; instead of a job, because the former is infused with passion and the latter is…well…a realistic way keep us alive.

Since we don’t get to play a lot as adults, why are we still sacrificing and wasting our precious playtime by tainting it with negative thoughts and emotions? Can we just be more disciplined to order ourselves to put our anxieties to rest and to bring out the inner child, letting him or her have the fun time of his or her life?

I think we can do that. We just have to act today.